Basic Technology Lesson Note JSS 1 Third Term

 

Basic Technology Scheme of Work for JSS1 Third Term 

Week 1

Revision of 2nd Term Work

Week 2

Woodwork hand-tools

 Week 3

Woodwork Hand-tools (cont’d.)

Week 4

METALWORK HAND-TOOLS:

Week 5

Metal Work (cont’d)

 

Week 6

Maintenance Of Tools And Machines

Week 7

Basic Electricity

Week 8

Basic Electricity (cont’d)

 Week 9

Basic Electricity (cont’d)

Basic Technology JSS1 Third Term

Below are the 2022 complete basic technology lesson notes for jss 1 third term

 Week 1

Revision of 2nd Term Work

 Week 2

Woodwork hand-tools

BORING TOOLS –

In machining, boring is the process of enlarging a hole that has already been drilled (or cast), by means of a single-point cutting tool (or of a boring head containing several such tools). Boring is used to achieve greater accuracy of the diameter of a hole and can be used to cut a tapered hole. Boring can be viewed as the internal-diameter counterpart to turning, which cuts external diameters.

Boring tools are used to make holes in wooden materials. The wooden material is held firm with braces before the boring is done. Some examples of boring tools are wood brace, ratchet brace, bradawl, etc; some of the boring tools are discussed below. To learn more: Click here

Week 3)

Woodwork Hand-tools (cont’d.)

 Driving and Impelling tools –

Driving tools include a variety of steel tools used to install, repair and maintain a variety of constructions. Drivers are used to drill, insert and drive screws, nuts and bolts into surfaces with mechanical and manual force. Tools defined as drivers include hammers, screwdrivers, mauls and sledges. Driving tools are used to fix nails and screws into wooden and metal materials. Nails are the iron material with a flat head and a stem with a sharp end. The stem is usually smooth. Screws look like nails but they have turned (twisted) stem. Screws are driven into wood with screwdrivers while nails are driven into wood and metals with the use of hammers.

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Basic Technology JSS1 Third Term

WEEK 4 

METALWORK HAND-TOOLS:

Content-

  • Introduction
  • Measuring tools
  • Marking out tools
  • Holding devices

INTRODUCTION:

Metals are types of materials used in the workshop to produce various objects. Metals can be classified as “Ferrous” when they contain iron, or “” non-ferrous” when they do not contain iron. Certain tools are used in the workshop to manipulate these metal materials to use them to form different objects. Some of the tools are used in marking, some used in measuring, some used in driving, while others are used in cutting the metals.

MEASURING TOOLS:

A measuring tool is a device used for measuring a physical quantity. Some of the existing tools are:

  1. Steel Rule (Engineer’s Rule)

 

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Week 5

Metal Work (cont’d)

Outline:

  • Driving tools
  • Boring tools/Cutting tools
  • Care and maintenance

DRIVING TOOLS:

Driving tools are used to fix nails and screws into wooden and metal materials. Nails are the iron material with the flat head and a stem with a sharp end. The stem is usually smooth. Screws look like nails but they have turned (twisted) stem.

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Week 6

Maintenance Of Tools And Machines

Course Outline:

  • Introduction to Maintenance
  • Types and Application of Maintenance
  • Importance of Maintenance

INTRODUCTION TO MAINTENANCE:

When we use machines and equipment for certain works, we always like to keep them active so that they will not disappoint us one day. A good car owner always checks his car to make sure it is in good condition before taking it to the road. He checks the oil level, radiator, water, battery, tyres, brakes and other components, to see if there is any problem.

TYPES OF MAINTENANCE:

There are three major types of maintenance which are: Preventive, Corrective and Predictive

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Basic Technology JSS1 Third Term

Week 7

Basic Electricity

Content:

  • Definition of Current
  • Types of Current
  • Definition of electric circuit and its components and symbols

Introduction –

When you hear the word ‘current,’ what does it make you think of? Perhaps water flowing down a river? That’s a good association, because that’s precisely the reason electrical current was given its name. Electrical current is very similar to a water current, only instead of water molecules moving down a river, charged particles move down a conductor. In this lesson, we’re going to explore what exactly current is, types of it, and find out that, unlike a water current, electrical current doesn’t always flow in one direction.

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Week 8 

Basic Electricity (cont’d)

Content:

— Measuring instruments

— Definition of Transformer, Stabilizer

— Electrical appliances and accessories

Measuring Instruments – 

1. A multimeter or a multitester, also known as a VOM (volt-ohm-milliammeter), is an electronic measuring instrument that combines several measurement functions in one unit. A typical multimeter can measure voltage, current, and resistance. A multimeter can be a hand-held device useful for basic fault finding and field service work, or a bench instrument which can measure to a very high degree of accuracy. They can be used to troubleshoot electrical problems in a wide array of industrial and household devices such as electronic equipment, motor controls, domestic appliances, power supplies, and wiring systems.

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Week 9 

Basic Electricity (cont’d)

Outline:

— Simple electrical calculation

Simple Electrical Calculation:

Ohm’s Law is the most fundamental formula in electrical circuits. It states that the electric current passing through a conductor is directly proportional to the potential difference across the conductor.

Ohm’s Law is best demonstrated in a simple DC electrical circuit. Although it also applies to AC circuits, care must be taken to account for other possible variables.

The relationship between current, voltage, and resistance in a circuit allows you to calculate one variable if you the values of the other two.

Equation:

Ohm’s Law shows the relationship between voltage, current, and resistance in a simple electrical circuit. The easiest form of the equation is:

V = IR

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