Physical Health Education  Scheme of Work for JSS3 First Term

 SCHEME OF WORK

 

WEEK 1: TRACK AND FIELD

WEEK 2: BASIC JAVELIN SKILLS

WEEK 3: HOCKEY

WEEK 4: FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT USED IN HOCKEY

WEEK 5: PATHOGENS, DISEASES AND THEIR PREVENTION

WEEK 6: NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES

WEEK 7&8: RECREATION, DANCE AND LEISURE

WEEK 9: TYPES OF COMPUTER GAMES

WEEK 10: PHYSICAL FITNESS AND BODY CONDITIONING PROGRAMMES

WEEK 11: REVISION 

WEEK 12: EXAMINATION 

 

Below are the 2022 complete JSS3 Physical Health Education  First Term Lesson Note 

Lesson Note on Physical and Health Education JSS3 First term

 

 

Week 1

Track and Field

Content

  1. Pole Vault skills
    – Grip, run-up, pole carrying, take-off, hang, swing up, pull-up and bar clearance, landing recovery.

Pole vault skills

Pole vault is a field event which involves jumping over a horizontally placed obstacle (bar) that ia supported by two uprights. The vaulter uses a pole as a lever for the up lift of the body. The competitor is expected to lift himself high with the pole from a single take off to clear the bar. The competitor is called a pole vaulter. It is performed by both male and female athletes.

Mode of competition

A competitor fails

  • If after a vault, the bar does not remain on the support because of the action of the competitors whilst vaulting or
  • If he touches the ground, including the landing area behind the vertical plane through the upper part of the stop board with any part of his body or with his pole with out first clearing the bar
  • If after leaving the ground he places his lower hand above the upper one or moves the upper hand higher on the pole.
  • If during vault an athlete replaces deliberately with his hands or fingers across bar which is about to fall off the supports. To learn more, click here 

WEEK 2

 Basic Javelin skills

Content

  1. Basic Javelin skills
    – Grip
    – carriage
    – run-up
    – release
    – Follow through
    – recovery

Basic Javelin skills

Javelin is a field event which involves the throwing of an implement with one hand for distance over a horizontal surface, the competitor is called javelin thrower.

Qualities of a good javelin thrower

  • He must be a fast runner
  • He must have a good arm extension prior to release
  • He must have a good sense of balance
  • He must have a good sense of coordination

To learn more, click here 

Week 3

TOPIC Hockey

Content

  1. Basic skills and techniques
  2. Rules and regulations
  3. Officials and their duties

Hockey

It is difficult to say where hockey originated, but it is of record that people of the ancient Greece, Romans, and Persians play the game as far back as 541 B.C. It is on record that the Persian noble played polo on horseback with sticks and ball, and the people played theirs on the ground as a modified polo. The year 1876 mark the beginning of modern hockey, when the rules and regulations were formed. The first woman hockey club was formed in England in 1887 and the international federation of hockey was formed in 1900. Hockey was introduced in U.S.A in 1901 and the first international competition was held in 1952.

Hockey is a field event played between two teams comprising eleven players each. The game is played with hockey sticks and ball. To learn more, click here 

Week 4

TopicHockey (II)

Contents

  • Facilities and equipment used in hockey
  • Values of the game
  • Diagram of Hockey pitch and stick

A. Facilities and Equipment used in hockey

  • The hockey pitch
  • The goal post
  • The sideboards
  • The nets
  • The flag post

To learn more, click here 

Week 5

Topic: Pathogens, diseases and their prevention

Communicable diseases

Communicable diseases are diseases that can be transferred from one person to another. Mode of transmission can be through direct contact, infected air droplet, contaminated food and water, or vector including insects. Some communicable diseases are often referred to as infectious diseases.

    To be classified as a communicable disease, an infection has to be present only in people affected by it and not those who are otherwise healthy and the healthy individuals who come into contact with the elements causing the infection have to fall ill as well. For an abnormality to be considered an infection the adverse agents have to come into the body, live for long enough to multiply and should be passed to other hosts easily. Communicable diseases are illnesses that are caused by viruses, bacteria, parasites, and prions, and are easily transferable from person to person. Communicable diseases cause infections that in most cases produce various kinds of symptoms, while the adverse agents responsible for the infections also need a weakened immune system to which they will make a problem. The stronger the adverse element, or a pathogen, coupled with a weak immune system, the stronger the infection. As a result, pathogens are classified based on the severity of destruction they cause for the organism. Primary pathogens are very strong and will result in an infection in healthy individuals, while also affecting other animals, as well. The extent of the infection produced by a primary pathogen depends on both its strength and the strength of the person it’s affecting. To learn more, click here 

Week 6

Topic: Non-communicable diseases

Non-communicable diseases

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are disease processes that are not contagious or transferable from one human to another. Random genetic abnormalities, heredity, lifestyle or environment can cause non-communicable diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, asthma, hypertension and osteoporosis. Autoimmune diseases, trauma, fractures, mental disorders, malnutrition, poisoning and hormonal conditions are in the category of non-communicable diseases.

Types of Non-communicable diseases

Cancer

Cancer is a non-communicable disease that affects all ages. As stated by the CDC in 2005, the three most common cancers among women are breast, lung and colorectal. The three most common cancers among men are prostate, lung and colorectal. Lung cancer is at the top of the list for cancer deaths in men and women. To learn more, click here 

Week 7 & 8

Topic: Recreation, dance and leisure

What is recreation?

 Recreation can be defined as participation in sporting activities during our leisure time through which one may better develop physically, mentally and emotionally and socially .It is a voluntary effort in which we don’t expect monetary gain. It is done for enjoyment at ones free time after the day work. Recreation is for fun, enjoyment, mental and physical benefits. Recreation is voluntary participation in leisure activities that are meaningful and enjoyable to the person involved.

 What is leisure?

 Dictionary Definition: The condition of having one’s time free from the demands of work or duty. Macquarie Dictionary

  • Freedom or spare time provided by the cessation of activities;
  • Free time as a result of temporary exemption from work or duties;
  • A time at one’s own command that is free of engagements or responsibilities;
  • A period of unemployed time;
  • Opportunity provided by free time

To learn more, click here 

Week 9

TOPIC Types of Computer Games

                                   Computer games

A computer is an electronic device which possesses the ability to receive information (input), store information for a period of time, and able to process data as output.

Examples of computer games

  • Nature park
  • Beach rally
  • Vehicle rally
  • Play station
  • Tennis
  • Scrabble
  • Cricket
  • Soccer
  • Volley ball
  • Hand ball
  • Golf
  • Tennis
  • Table tennis
  • Badminton

To learn more, click here 

Week 10

TOPIC Physical fitness and body conditioning programmes

Physical Fitness

Physical fitness is the ability of an individual to perform his daily work well without feeling too tired and still have reserved energy. Physical fitness is also a state of health and well-being, and, more specifically, the ability to perform aspects of sports, occupations and daily activities. Physical fitness is generally achieved through proper nutrition, moderate-vigorous exercise and sufficient rest.

Components of physical fitness:

The attempt to define the term physical fitness, has led to the identification of the components that make up physical fitness. This account for the reason experts have attempted to group the components into two;

  1. The health-related components
  2. Skill or performance-related components

To learn more, click here 

Week 11 – Revision

Overview – We shall be examined all we have learned this term.

Week 12 – Examination

Overview – This week, we shall be examined all we have learned this term.